Skip to main content Skip to footer

The Rights Removal Bill & Human Rights Act Reform

Here you will find all of BIHR's work around the Rights Removal Bill and Human Rights Act reform with information about how you can get involved.

On 22nd June 2022, the Government published a new Bill that would get rid of our Human Rights Act. They're calling it the Bill of Rights - but it's exactly the opposite. This is a Rights Removal Bill and represents the latest step in plans to reduce their responsibilities to uphold the human rights protections people rely on every day across the UK.

It's more important now than ever to stand up for our human rights. We'll be releasing new resources explaining what's happening and what you can do. You'll find all our existing resources below and we'll be updating this page regularly.

Easy Read Guides

Explore our Easy Read guides to the Rights Removal Bill.

22 June 2022

Our CEO's Statement on the Rights Removal Bill

"Everyone in the UK, wants to be able to live with dignity and respect, where those who hold power follow the rules; this is what our law, the Human Rights Act, helps secure. Sadly, what we now face is a UK Government intent on ripping up the rulebook.

Rather than championing our human rights protections, this new anti-rights bill is a power grab from the Government. Unsupported by the evidence of people across the UK, and in direct opposition to the findings of the Independent Review it set up, which concluded there was no case for replacing our Human Rights Act.

The Human Rights Act has worked well, serving its purpose to provide legal protection for everyone's fundamental rights, here at home. In schools and hospitals, local councils and national departments, courts and care homes, people are benefitting from the protection of our human rights in everyday ways that do not grab headline, but which do make a difference.

Now more than ever, as we face a cost of living crisis, so many more of us will be driven into needing the safety net of human rights. Yet the Government is whipping it away in favour of a law that gifts rights dependent on whether people have the fear or favour of those in power. These are not the actions of a government that respects human rights, or indeed the value of law, order, and justice.”

“In a democracy that values rights and the rule of the law any self-respecting government seeking to change our human rights protections would only be doing so to improve them, and they would want the fullest possible parliamentary scrutiny of their plans. This government has said that it will neither allow pre-legislative scrutiny of its proposals, and nor, we can confirm through a BIHR FOI request, will it publish the twelve and half thousand responses to its consultation.  These are not the actions of a transparent government that welcomes democratic debate and freedom of speech.

People and power, that's what our Human Rights Act is about, and it's what this Government's plans to reduce our protections are about - weakening our rights and reducing their responsibility to us. Every single day people rely on our Human Rights Act, because we know this world isn't perfect. Working with 1000s of people each year, including public officials, we know people won't be fooled by this power grab by the Government.

People won't be fooled by the popularist attempts to justify reducing our rights by references to those the Government think will be considered "undeserving". People won't be fooled by the Government's attempts to dress up a new law that lessens their accountability to us, as something positive by calling it a bill of rights. We all know rules matter, not just the rules the Government wants to play by, but the rules that make sure we can hold them to account for treating us with dignity and respect. People won't be fooled; we know that our Human Rights Act matters every day, to everyone, and that's why it must stay.”

Why Our Human Rights Act Matters

Get involved

There are lots of ways you can get involved.

Stay up-to-date

Get our newsletter

Get monthly updates on UK human rights law and our work, resources and events sent straight to your inbox.