This is a hub for young people where you will find loads of info about your rights under the Convention on the Rights of the Child. We’ll call it CRC for short. Organisations working with young people might also find this stuff useful. There are Factsheets and a short video.

Every five years, the UK Government has to report to a special Committee at the United Nations about how well it is doing to protect these rights. Because it is about your rights it is important that you know how this process happens and how you can be involved to make sure the important issues for young people are being heard.


Click on the pictures below to download the resources:


  • The Factsheets were written by the British Institute of Human Rights (BIHR for short) with input from young people and is also available in EasyRead
  • You can follow us on Twitter @EHRC or on Facebook for future updates.
  • You can also follow the British Institute of Human Rights on Twitter @BIHRhumanrights or visit them at their website.

About the CRC

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The ‘Convention on the Rights of the Child’ is an agreement written by the member countries of United Nations about the rights of children and young people. We will call it ‘CRC’ for short.

What does it say?

The CRC lists over 40 rights belonging to children and young people called ‘Articles’, including:
  • The right to express your views and have them taken into account in matters that affect you (Article 12)
  • The right to be free from all forms of violence (Article 19)
  • The right to play, rest and leisure (Article 31)
The CRC says that in any decision about you, what is best for you should be a top priority. Check out the More Info page to learn more about all the rights in the CRC.

Is it for me?

The CRC is for everybody below the age of 18. Some rights in the CRC protect certain groups of young people. For example if you are living away from home or you’ve had to escape the country you were born in, there are rights to make sure you are treated fairly and your needs are met.

Read the 'About the CRC' Resource

How it Works

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In 1991 the UK Government made a promise to the United Nations to respect children’s rights. It did this by agreeing to the Convention on the Rights of the Child (or ‘CRC’ for short). The CRC has over 40 rights for children and young people (under 18).

How are rights in the CRC protected?

The CRC says that governments should do everything they can to make sure children’s rights are respected and protected. This means the Government should be thinking about your rights when it is making decisions like making new laws and policies. Every five years they have to tell the UN about how they have done this.

Read the 'How it Works' Resource



The CRC in the UK

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In 1991 the UK Government made an international promise to the United Nations to respect children’s rights. It did this by agreeing to the Convention on the Rights of the Child (or ‘CRC’ for short). The CRC contains over 40 rights for young people aged under 18. Every five years the UK Government has to report to a United Nations Committee of children’s rights experts who check whether the rights in the CRC are being respected and protected here in the UK. The report includes information from governments in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Read the 'CRC in the UK' Resource



Who's Who?

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There are a number of people important to protecting the rights in the Convention on the Rights of the Child:
  • CRC Committee
  • UK Government
  • Children and young people
  • Non-governmental organisations
  • Equality and Human Rights Commission
  • Children’s Commissioners

Read the 'Who's Who?' Resource

Get Involved

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Every five years a United Nations Committee of children’s rights experts (the ‘CRC Committee’) asks the UK government to tell them how it has been respecting and protecting children’s rights. This is known as the ‘examination process’.

The UK Government writes a report telling the Committee what it has been doing to protect children’s rights. Charities (or non-governmental organisations), the Children’s Commissioners, and the Equality and Human Rights Commission will tell the Committee how well they think the governments are doing at protecting children’s rights.

The Committee will recommend things the government should do to improve children’s rights. You can get involved in this! It’s really important that information about young people’s rights is shared with the Committee.

The Government has to send its next report to the CRC Committee next year. Check out the Get Involved Factsheet. You can also get in touch with the Children’s Rights Alliance for England at info@crae.org.uk who will be bringing children and young people together to write their own report to the CRC Committee.

Read the 'Get Involved' Resource

More information about my rights
More information about this project