Want more information on your rights as a young person, or further resources on the rights of young people? Check out some of the websites below.

I am under 13

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The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Guide for children and young people

This booklet explains each right in the Convention on the Rights of the Child in a child friendly way. It was produced by the Scottish Government.

What Rights?

This is a summary of the rights in the Convention on the Rights of Child for children. It was produced by the Children’s Commissioner in Wales.

Understanding Your Rights

This is a short leaflet produced by the Northern Ireland Children’s Commissioner explaining the rights young people have under the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Your Rights in Pictures

The Children’s Commissioner in Scotland has produced Your Rights in Pictures: explaining all the rights young people have through pictures.

All Children

This is a book explaining the rights in the Convention of the Rights of the Child in a simple way. It was produced by UNCRC Let’s Get it Right (Wales).

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC)

This is a short cartoon video introduction to the Convention on the Rights of the Child by the Children’s Rights Alliance (Ireland). 


I am a teenager

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Children's Human Rights: What they are and why they matter

This booklet is written for teenagers by Children’s Rights Alliance for England. It provides a history of children’s rights law and categorises and explains the rights in the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Our rights

This leaflet is written by UNICEF United Kingdom for children and young people. It is a summary of the rights in the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

20th Anniversary of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

This video is a good background introduction to the Convention on the Rights of the Child for teenagers. It was produced by Unicef on the progress that has been made in children’s rights over the last 20 years.

The state of children's rights in England 2009

This report by Children’s Rights Alliance for England summarises the state of children’s rights in England in 2009. It is written for young people. The report categorises the rights in the Convention on the Rights of the Child and explains how England has protected rights and what the government still needs to do to protect children’s rights.

Concluding Observations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child- Version for Children and Young People

This book is the young people’s version of the Concluding Observations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child in 2008. It summarises the observations of the Committee by the types of right young people have under the Convention on the Rights of the Child. It was published by the Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister with the Commissioner for Children and Young People for Northern Ireland (NICCY) and the Children’s Law Centre.

How children and young people can have a say in European and International decision-making

This is a guide written by Children’s Rights Alliance for England on how young people can get involved in international decision making processes.

Do children’s rights matter?

This video by Children’s Rights Alliance (Ireland) follows a group of teenagers in Ireland as they discuss children’s rights and how they are affected by them.

UNCRC History

This cartoon video by Funky Dragon explains the history behind the Convention on the Rights of the Child. 


I am an adult

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Are you an adult?

 

A Better Life for Every Child

This leaflet, written by Unicef, lists the rights young people have in the Convention of the Rights of the Child.

Complete explanation of the UNCRC

This booklet by Funky Dragon provides any youth group worker with a complete and comprehensive overview of children’s rights as established by the Convention on the Rights of the Child. It includes a history of the development of these rights and a complete copy of the Convention as well as a “young person friendly” version.

Children as Researchers

This report is on a project conducted by Funky Dragon on how to increase participation of children in the Convention on the Rights of the Child examination process. The report contains the method of the project so it can be replicated by other youth groups.

Funky Dragon Guide to Participation

The Funky Dragon Guide to Participation was written in order to develop the effective participation of children and young people in decision-making. The guide is aimed at anyone who is part of national or local government, a statutory or voluntary agency, a group or an individual.

Children's Rights in the Courts: Using the convention of the rights of the child in legal proceedings affecting children

This book, written by Children’s Rights Alliance for England, is aimed at anyone who works with children as it explains the Convention on the Rights of the Child can be used in proceedings and the principal benefits to children. Its aim is to help increase the use of the CRC in UK legal proceedings where children are affected. 


Understanding important terms

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Human Rights: Human rights are guarantees to make sure we can all live safe and well, no matter who we are. The CRC lists over 40 rights that belong to children and young people (under 18 years old).

Convention/Treaty: When lots of countries think something is really important, like children’s rights, they get together, write down some rules and then they all agree to follow those rules. This is called a convention or a treaty.

Committee: After a convention is signed, the countries involved choose a group of people to look at whether everybody is following the rules. They choose experts (e.g. in children’s rights) from all the different countries who together form a committee.

Responsibilities: Just like we have to follow the law, the government has rules it has to follow too. We call a rule that the government must follow because it has signed a convention a responsibility.

United Nations: Representatives from 193 countries in the world get together in New York City and Geneva to make decisions about how we can make the world a peaceful and good place to live.